First off, picking an eminent person is hard. I switched between a few people, and really only made my final decision based on a need to finish this post. I guess that just shows that there’s a lot of eminent people out there, ready for grade 9’s and 10’s to write speeches about them.

My eminent person is Franz Kafka. Born in July of 1883, he is considered one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. Born to a German-speaking family in Prague, his numerous novels and stories have inspired many writers, to the point of inventing the term “Kafkaesque” to refer to anything influenced by his style of writing.

Some of my goals for this project are to discover more about why Kafka’s style is so influential and wide-spread. His ideas obviously resonate with people, and I want to know why, and if I can connect with any of them. I would also like to get a chance to read more of Kafka’s works, and see what connections I can make to him. In addition, throughout my project I’d like to research more about different writing styles.

I chose my eminent person partly due to time constraints, but also because I like writing as well. Franz Kafka wished for his unfinished manuscripts, books that would become some of his most recognized, to be burned. I can understand this feeling of embarrassment that comes from writing something, and not wanting anyone to see. It’s a pervasive feeling, and understanding that I can acknowledge why he’d want these books to be hidden away permanently.

In order to achieve my goals on this project, I’ve gone to the library to take out a few of his most known books. These include “Metamorphosis”, “The Castle”; “Amerika”, and “The Process.” I’ve also gotten a few biographies, and found some scholarly articles discussing his books, like university-level novel studies. These will help me to discover what makes Kafka’s style so distinct revolutionary.

 

Citations and links:

Kafka, Franz. The Castle. New York: Knopf, 1954. Libcom.org. Oxford Classics. Web.

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2013/oct/24/different-kafka/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2639911/